Assessment and the Web; an illustration

For the past months I have been researching innovative approaches to “assessment” on the web; I have read a lot of articles and papers (I even helped write one), listened to many people talk about it and argue over it, and have come to one conclusion; Assessment has more first and last names than a secret agent in international missions; There is embedded assessment, formative assessment, evidence based, peer assessment, game based assessment (a personal favorite) stealth assessment and self assessment, the list goes on. As a result when discussing online assessment there is one thing that becomes very clear; nobody is quite sure what it really means! Which I personally think is a good thing, since I feel that when designing assessment for the web we should look at many different theories and apply whatever pieces fit the best. However, being the visual type I couldn’t help but draw a small illustration of assessment and the web. Let me know if you found it helpful!Assessment-and-the-web
* If you want to delve deeper into assessment here are some good starting points;

Davidson, C. N. (2011). Now you see it: How the brain science of attention will transform the way we live, work, and learn. New York: Viking.

Educause (2011). Deeper Learning: Resources. Retrieved from  http://www.educause.edu/Resources/Browse/Deeper%20Learning/31407

Gibson, D. (2009). Designing a computational model of learning. In R. Ferdig (Ed.), Handbook of research on effective electronic gaming in education (2nd ed.). Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference.

Halavais, A. (2012). A genealogy of badges: Inherited meaning and monstrous moral hybrids. Information, Communication and Society 15(3), 354-373, doi: 10.1080/1369118X.2011.641992

Schwartz, D. L., & Arena, D. Choice based assessment in the digital era. Stanford University School of Education August 2009. Retrieved from http://aaalab.stanford.edu/papers/ChoiceSchwartzArenaAUGUST232009.pdf

Star, S. L. (2010). This is Not a Boundary Object: Reflections on the Origin of a Concept. Science Technology And Human Values, 35(5), 601-617. Sage Publications, Inc. doi:10.1177/0162243910377624

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